What Causes Myterious Sounds All Over the World


There were a lot of rumors spreading across the internet saying that a lot of people are hearing strange sounds and some say that there’s so loud noise that even set off car alarms. Sometimes they describe it as a hum or low rumble; other times it’s a whine, thump, or even a melody. Often the sounds have been recorded and posted online, fueling rumors and conspiracy theories.

According to Wiki, the Hum is a phenomenon, or collection of phenomena, involving a persistent and invasive low-frequency humming, rumbling, or droning noise not audible to all people. Hums have been widely reported by national media in the UK and the United States. The Hum is sometimes prefixed with the name of a locality where the problem has been particularly publicized: e.g., the "Bristol Hum", the "Taos Hum", or the "Bondi Hum".

Data from a Taos Hum study suggests that a minimum of two percent and perhaps as many as 11 percent of the population could detect the Taos Hum and the Daily Telegraph in 1996 likewise reported a figure of two percent of people hearing the Bristol Hum. For those who can hear the Hum it can be a very disturbing phenomenon and it has been linked to at least three suicides in the UK. However, amongst those who cannot hear the hum and some specialists, there has been skepticism about whether, it in fact, exists.

Sounding like groans and powerful horns, the unsettling noises were heard recently from Europe to Canada.



In Germany noises coming from the sky were recorded on a video camera and uploaded to YouTube, with car alarms clearly heard going off in the background.

But experts have said that there are rational explanations.

University of Saskatchewan physics professor Jean-Pierre St. Maurice told CTV that it’s electromagnetic noise emitted from auroras and radiation belts.

Meanwhile, Geoscientist David Deming from the University of Oklahoma, has previously written about a phenomenon called The Hum – ‘a mysterious and untraceable sound that is heard in certain locations around the world by two to ten per cent of the population’.

Writing in the Journal of Scientific Exploration, he said that sources of The Hum could include telephone transmissions and ‘aircraft operated by the U.S Navy for the purpose of submarine communications’.

According to NASA, the Earth has ‘natural radio emissions’.

The Agency said: ‘If humans had radio antennas instead of ears, we would hear a remarkable symphony of strange noises coming from our own planet. Scientists call them "tweeks," "whistlers" and "sferics."

'They sound like background music from a flamboyant science fiction film, but this is not science fiction. Earth's natural radio emissions are real and, although we're mostly unaware of them, they are around us all the time.’

For instance lightning can produce eerie-sounding radio emissions, NASA added.

According to seismologist Brian W. Stump from the Southern Methodist University in Dallas, earthquakes can also produce sub-audible sounds.

Let’s get on with the facts, sounds were really propagated by science of course, and we can site proof for that. But as far as aliens were concerned, there would be no invasion or whatsoever. Of course, for some people, it’s more fun to think that the mysterious sounds are part of an alien invasion or secret military experiment than machinery at a local sewage plant.

Cheerio!

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